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GX1000 vs SST1500 PSU's for 30-60 mechanical disk array

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(@jantee)
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Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 1
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hi guys im building a disk array which will consist of 30 drives to start with and move up too 60 drives. 

i need 2 ATX power supplys for these drives and im thinking the GX1000 or the SST1500 (40amp older version, not the 25amp gold)

the SST1500 has quite a large 5v rail of 40amps, which is the ultimate decider, as the 5v rail i need to be larger to accomodate for heaps and heaps of drives. but im afraid of the SST1500 efficiencies and regulations/ripples etc because it is so old.. it might kill a drive, or fail permature compared to a GX-1000.

the reason for choosing a GX-1000 is the 5x peripheral modular cable input, so i can put 5x custom modular cables to the psu with 10x sata power connections on the cables, for up too 50 drives. the SSt1500 only has 4x peripheral inputs but this is ok, just use 16-14awg cable and put 12+ sata connections on cables.

i am writing because i want to know if my thinking is on the right track being weary of the SST1500. and whether you guys know of a more modern PSU with a larger 5v rail. everything is 25amps now to comply with efficiency stamps "gold/platinum etc" and i dont know what to do. i am also calculating 5v rail requirments based on worst case scenario amperage loads of 1amp, which only leaves 16-25 drives, 80-120 watts. but ideally i would only want to load it 80-100watts. so its looking like 16-20 drives off the GX-1000. But i can double that number if we dont equate for worst case startup amp load, and go for operating load... im just calculating for worst case scenario, and need some guidance!

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cheers!

This topic was modified 5 months ago by Jantee

   
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(@crmaris)
Member Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 64
 

several of the modern PSUs can supply up to 35A at 5V, since their OCPs are way higher. Typically most can do >30A at 5V. I don't remember specifics right now, but you can look at the protection features section on my reviews, to find which can go higher at 5V before shutting down. 


   
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